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>> No.18551698 [View]
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18551698

>Sternhell, Neither Left nor Right
>Gregor, The Ideology of Fascism
The more you know about leftism the more you will realize that fascism and third positionism are legitimate extensions of it. For the related thesis that fascism is modernism done right, not a return to tradition or mere reaction, and not totalitarianism, read Griffin, Modernism and Fascism. Also read about the movement called the conservative revolution.

For right-wing anticapitalism that combines the best of theory and praxis, read these four articles:
https://www.counter-currents.com/tag/breaking-the-bondage-of-interest/

And these if you want:
https://counter-currents.com/2014/10/kerry-boltons-the-banking-swindle/
https://counter-currents.com/2014/11/central-banking-and-human-bondage/

From there you can pretty much go anywhere. Some form of social credit or integralism, Italian fascism or national socialism, Falangism, Peronism, National Bolshevism. However I recommend that above all you read Samuel T. Francis, Leviathan and its Enemies. First read about Buchanan and Buchananism (he was his friend and advisor) and then read Francis' short article "From Household to Nation," then ideally learn a bit about Burnham's managerial class thesis and Mosca's and Pareto's "circulation of elites" theories (https://counter-currents.com/2018/04/the-ruling-class/), then read Leviathan. It is a comprehensive guide to right-socialist populism to resist the coming war with the elites.

Another interesting thing to look into is Paul Piccone, who moved toward synthesizing the post-Soviet Left (not the New Left, which is progressive astroturf) with the New Right. I highly recommend this overview:
https://c2cjournal.ca/2009/06/where-marx-and-conservatives-meet-the-writings-of-paul-piccone/

I also recommend reading Christopher Lasch's Revolt of the Elites, possibly before reading Francis' Leviathan.

In terms of resisting the coming total war with capital, which is allying with all kinds of hideous technology oligarchs and has already allied with technology itself, the right is definitely the way to go. But there is nothing wrong with taking all the theory leftism has to offer if it's useful. French social theory is very useful for understanding technologies of control and how to break free of them and create counter-movements. Marxist theory is invaluable for understanding class warfare, it's just wrong about its Hegelian eschatology. The best Marxists and anarchists are very useful theorists of how to create and sustain praxis-oriented movements (Gramsci) and blanquist vanguards (Leninism), and Marxism has a century and a half of self-critique of these tendencies and their pitfalls that the right can learn a lot from. It's even best to understand fascism as a product of the failures of Marxism and the unresolved antinomies of the Second International. That's certainly how Mussolini, a Second International Marxist turned fascist, saw it.

>> No.18540296 [View]
File: 31 KB, 500x235, usury.jpg [View same] [iqdb] [saucenao] [google] [report]
18540296

>Sternhell, Neither Left nor Right
>Gregor, The Ideology of Fascism
The more you know about leftism the more you will realize that fascism and third positionism are legitimate extensions of it. For the related thesis that fascism is modernism done right, not a return to tradition or mere reaction, and not totalitarianism, read Griffin, Modernism and Fascism. Also read about the movement called the conservative revolution.

For right-wing anticapitalism that combines the best of theory and praxis, read these four articles:
https://www.counter-currents.com/tag/breaking-the-bondage-of-interest/

And these if you want:
https://counter-currents.com/2014/10/kerry-boltons-the-banking-swindle/
https://counter-currents.com/2014/11/central-banking-and-human-bondage/

From there you can pretty much go anywhere. Some form of social credit or integralism, Italian fascism or national socialism, Falangism, Peronism, National Bolshevism. However I recommend that above all you read Samuel T. Francis, Leviathan and its Enemies. First read about Buchanan and Buchananism (he was his friend and advisor) and then read Francis' short article "From Household to Nation," then ideally learn a bit about Burnham's managerial class thesis and Mosca's and Pareto's "circulation of elites" theories (https://counter-currents.com/2018/04/the-ruling-class/), then read Leviathan. It is a comprehensive guide to right-socialist populism to resist the coming war with the elites.

Another interesting thing to look into is Paul Piccone, who moved toward synthesizing the post-Soviet Left (not the New Left, which is progressive astroturf) with the New Right. I highly recommend this overview:
https://c2cjournal.ca/2009/06/where-marx-and-conservatives-meet-the-writings-of-paul-piccone/

I also recommend reading Christopher Lasch's Revolt of the Elites, possibly before reading Francis' Leviathan.

In terms of resisting the coming total war with capital, which is allying with all kinds of hideous technology oligarchs and has already allied with technology itself, the right is definitely the way to go. But there is nothing wrong with taking all the theory leftism has to offer if it's useful. French social theory is very useful for understanding technologies of control and how to break free of them and create counter-movements. Marxist theory is invaluable for understanding class warfare, it's just wrong about its Hegelian eschatology. The best Marxists and anarchists are very useful theorists of how to create and sustain praxis-oriented movements (Gramsci) and blanquist vanguards (Leninism), and Marxism has a century and a half of self-critique of these tendencies and their pitfalls that the right can learn a lot from. It's even best to understand fascism as a product of the failures of Marxism and the unresolved antinomies of the Second International. That's certainly how Mussolini, a Second International Marxist turned fascist, saw it.



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